THE ANFIELD NOISE

The Book Thread

I read quite a lot, mostly non fiction and I know we had one the last board so here goes.

My current one is “A short History of Portugal” as I’m still planning a trip there in October.

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Currently reading this fascinating book The Ultimate Goal by our former RAW (our intelligence/spy wing) chief. It’s explains how countries build narratives through various means (academia, movies, books, etc). Also touches upon the power of social media.

Also, eagerly waiting for JonnySun’s next.

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People don’t read much now!!! :flushed: :sob:

Anyone here read the series by Laura Ingalls Wilder???

People dont read much :face_with_monocle: absolute Tosh old chap.

Currently re-readng The Brentford Trilogy(Robert Rankin) and And Another Thing (Eoin Colfer).

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I think a lot of people still read, just not books anymore. They have just move to that thingy…what’s the name…

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I have gone into that darkness :sob:
Not bought a Kindle but have the app on my phone along with ReadEra.
I probably have over a thousand books on my phone and still have shelves of books as well.

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I finished Anna Karenina last weekend. I loved it but didn’t see it as the best novel of all time when done. I do have a terrible habit of re-reading books and taking notes after I’m done with the first pass. I’ve spent the last week reading sections again and I cannot believe the amount of substance I had missed, including the complexity of characters, the symbolism of geography, the importance of family, and the existential journey. I still favor War and Peace, but Karenina has vaulted toward the top of books I’ve read.

I’ve grudgingly placed it back in my shelf. Otherwise I will never move on with life. I’m reading Gorky’s Mother next.

But I really hope I can return to reading Anna Karenina again one day.

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Though I only read the Bangla translations, I loved the trilogy biography more.

Actually, I can’t remember anything from Mother :sob:

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I’m currently reading The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones. It was almost universally included in best book of the year lists, and presented as being like a mix Stephen King and Peter Straub’s Ghost Story. But Im bored senseless by it. I cant read more than about 10 pages without deciding to put it down and go to bed.

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I am reading more non-fiction these days. Still, occasionally, I would pick up a really huge fiction (multiple volumes).

  • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen (suggested by @Arminius) - currently reading
  • To the Edges of the Earth: 1909, the Race for the Three Poles, and the Climax of the Age of Exploration by Edward J. Larson
  • A Warning by Anonymous
  • Permanent Record by Edward Snowden
  • Dead Mountain: The Untold True Story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident by Donnie Eichar
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As a part time insomniac I may have to give that a try.

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What is the Snowdon piece like? Only I listen to his interviews now and again and he strikes me as a word salad specialist; talks around things with no gold a bit like El Dorado. I imagine there is an assassination order out on him!

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Slaughterhouse 5 - absolutely loving it!

In the queue:

Libra - Delillo
Ubik - Dick

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I enjoyed the read. As it’s an autobiography, there were lots of personal growing up bits. For those expecting a book full on the government’s actions and spying on its citizen, they are going to be disappointed. I remember reading one of the reviewers stating that he was expecting just that, so only Chapter 20+ worth the read.

I treated the book as an autobiography, so I was not disappointed. In fact, with Snowden describing his upbringing and his own character, it linked up well with the 2nd half of the book, on why he became whistleblower of the programs such as Prism.

One of the next book on my read list, also related to Snowden, is Dark Mirror: Edward Snowden and the American Surveillance State by Barton Gellman.

If you are interested in reading some investigational pieces on US government’s programs (previous and current), I would recommend Annie Jacobsen. I have read 5 of her books. Her latest book is Surprise, Kill, Vanish: The Secret History of CIA Paramilitary Armies, Operators, and Assassins.

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Billy Pilgrim and so it goes.

What a book.

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Completely Haha!! My mate is a fan also, he lost his Mum last week, with no disrespect, you can guess what message he sent me!!!

I replied with:

‘Thats the attractive thing about war’ said Rosewater. Absolutely everybody gets a little something.’

What a brave, intricate and marvelously original piece of work!

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Thanks for that, I will actually make a note on her and check it out. I do enjoy anything that gets under the State. A few years back I read R Dolan, UFO’s and the National Security State and have only just recovered!

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I am sorry for your friend’s loss. There’s a lot in that book for us earthlings. For instance, we need to stop focusing on the “awful times” and concentrate on the “good ones”. I hope your friend finds solace in that.

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The sad news didnt come as a surprise to him, but still, its one of the worst experiences we can have. Thanks Pal its very nice of you to say! He’d happily meet her again on Tralfamadore.

Incidentally, the Tralfamadorian (is that a word!) view of time was completely mind boggling!

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That was indeed a mind bender. I believe they also told you freewill exists only on Earth. That wasn’t easy either.

Man, I love that book. Your description of it above was so good.

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